Paint Effects & An Art School in Paris

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Ryan gave a lot of great information about colors and painting mediums at his workshop: which ones to use, how to use them, and how to get certain effects. a great base for flesh tone is genuine vermillion, lemon ochre, lazurite (lapis lazuli) and lead white.

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Orange Molybdate is great for warmth in flesh tones.

Ryan almost never uses cadmium orange, accept maybe for a fall painting. Gamblin’s Asphaltum is a nice reddish transparent brown that’s great for open grisaille studies or as an ‘imprimatura’.20131212-175838.jpg

As for ‘sinking in’, most colors do that to different degrees depending on the surface you paint on. This requires that you oil out your surface before painting into it, so you can see the color and value as it should be. You can “oil out” the painting by using ½ mineral spirits and ½ oleogel (Natural Pigments) to build a couche (a layer) you will immediately paint into, or 3 parts mineral spirits and 1 part oleogel in the places you don’t intend to paint into. This will bring the vibrancy back to the painting everywhere, making it easier to make relative decisions about color and value, as well as creating a great surface to work into, in the areas where you built the couche.

Ryan is working toward making an art school in Paris. His vision is to establish a 6 year academy. What Juliard is for music, the CAS would be for painting.

Envisioned future school in France

Envisioned future school in France

He plans to also revive the concept of the Prix de Rome competition, which was an arts scholarship created in 1663 for students who proved their talents in a qualifying competition.

The prize was a fully paid 3-5 year continuation of a students art education that acted as, not only a platform by which the students were introduced to collectors and patrons, but also a transitional period that allowed the students to transition from being students to being catapulted into their professional careers. The winners got to live at the Palazzo Mancini for free. How great is that!

Prix de Roma

Prix de Roma

Shelli Alford is an artist and author, who enjoys learning from master oil painters from around the world and reviewing their classes, workshops and demonstrations.

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2 Comments

  1. mookiemu

    January 6, 2014 at 9:13 am

    That’s terrific! This is what the art world needs right now. I told you, the zeitgeist is turning in our direction. 🙂

    By the way, you should try poppy seed oil as a medium. It’s a little thicker than linseed oil and doesn’t have the yellowing problem linseed oil does. But it holds the stroke beautifully and does a great job of showing off the texture of each stroke. Of course if you are looking for a more smoothed out effect then poppy oil is not right. But for painterly technique, the poppy oil fantastic.

    • Shelli Alford

      January 7, 2014 at 5:08 pm

      I love that word Ricky! Zeitgeist is really turning our way. When that happens, and I do believe it will, we will be looking at the top painters of representational art marking money like John Baldessari (his last painting sold for around 4 million). Although, the other edge of that sword will be, how many decent workshops will be left to go to. I better hurry up and study under as many people as possible!

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